On February 18, 2015, I wrote about a New York City-area scheme where three individuals helped as many as 500 people cheat on the Commercial Driver’s License (“CDL”) test. More recently, a multi-agency investigation in Florida has uncovered a similar scheme involving a commercial truck driving school. The Department of Transportation’s Office of the Inspector General, the FBI, Homeland Security and the Florida Highway Patrol joined forces to uncover the plot, which enabled unqualified drivers to receive CDLs. Ellariy Medvednik, Natalia Dontsova, Adrian Salari and Clarence Davis were all charged in connection with the investigation. These people were affiliated with Larex, Inc., a commercial truck driving school that marketed itself to Russian-speakers online.
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Recently, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (“FMCSA”) released a crash accountability study that focused on whether incorporating Police Accident Reports (“PARs”) in its crash fault weighting system would improve the Agency’s ability to target carriers most at-risk for crashes.

The report focused on crash accountability in the FMCSA’s Compliance, Safety, Accountability (“CSA”) Program.  CSA

Trucking companies now have access to technologies which can dramatically improve the safety of their operation, safe on fuel costs, and provide accurate feedback concerning the conduct of their drivers.  For example, products like “Smartdrive” utilize a multi-camera computer interface to simultaneously capture video footage of the driver’s actions within the cab of the truck

Under the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Regulations, commercial truckers are required to conduct pre- and post-trip inspections of their vehicles in order to identify and document safety defects and maintenance concerns.  Previously, truckers were required to complete Driver Vehicle Inspection Reports (“DVIRs”) documenting the results of their inspections.  Trucking companies were required to retain

The trucking industry is heavily regulated.  Unfortunately, those very regulations, which exist to insure the safety of the motoring public (that’s you, me and everyone else on the road), are frequently ignored by trucking companies, large and small, often with devastating results.  When a person is injured in a crash with a tractor

Despite the American public’s overwhelming opposition to increasing the number of hours that a truck driver can work each week, Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) has introduced legislation that would increase truckers’ weekly hours from 70 to 82.  The “Collins Amendment” is currently before the Appropriations Committee.

In a recent poll conducted by Lake Research Partners,

As you may have previously read on this blog, or seen elsewhere in the news, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is currently considering new regulations that would raise the federal minimum insurance requirements for trucks and buses. Approximately 4,000 people die in truck crashes each year.  Studies have revealed that a fatal truck

As a trucking attorney and consumer safety advocate, I am pleased to report that the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (“FMCSA”) has recently announced that it is considering a rulemaking to increase the minimum levels of financial responsibility for interstate motor carriers, as well as rulemaking pertaining to broker and freight forwarders, trip insurance, bus

More than 3 decades ago, air disc brakes were introduced in North America. Air disc brakes offer significant safety advantages over drum brakes. Namely, the use of disc brakes results in shorter stopping distances, increased brake life and decreased maintenance expenses. Furthermore, air disc brakes are inherently self-adjusting, so a trucking company’s concerns over braking